Life at Yahoo

This is what it's like to work at Yahoo.
6 posts for Women in Tech

Founder of Yahoo! Spain invited to meet Spanish Princess

Posted: 20th of December, 2012

Our very own Noelia Fernandez, EMEA’s vice president of Media Network, was born 40 years ago in Santander, Spain. Since then, she’s founded Yahoo Spain, become the Director of Products & Services, moved to the European headquarters to become the Head of Audience for the EMEA region, and now leads the Media Network Group for EMEA.

 

40 years ago, another amazing woman was born: Spanish Princess Letizia Ortiz Rocasolano. In honor of the Princess’ 40th birthday, Tiempo magazine gathered 12 outstanding women to help her celebrate. Noelia was on the guest list. It was an informal meeting where they shared personal stories of their achievements, and chatted about issues, including the current financial situation in Spain, and the evolving roles of women in the workplace.

 

Along with Noelia, the list included: Inma Shara, orchestra conductor; Laia Marull, actress; Eugenia Rico, writer; Concha Buika, singer; Conchita Martínez, tennis player; Carmen Belén Molina Caballero, Chemical Engineer professor; Montserrat Martí Caballé, soprano; Gema Gallardo, NGO President; Teresa San Jurjo, Foundation Director; the senator María Elena Diego Castellanos (PSOE); and Juliana Fernández Cueva Lominchar (PP, the party in the Spanish Government).


The 12 women were chosen for their amazing accomplishments, each innovators and leaders in their fields. These remarkable women were all in their forties and are winning leaders in their own areas, including literature, music, cinema, sports, politics, culture and the Internet. As a group, they felt that being in their forties is a great age for them, and for women in general, as it’s usually a time when there’s clarity around the paths that they’ve chosen. "I was so proud to represent in that meeting women in technology and business in front of the Princess and that amazing group and explain how what me and many Yahoos everyday that impact lives of many Spanish and citizens around the World,” said Noelia. “Yahoo! is the best place in the world to do that if you have a passion for technology and for content. They all smiled and one told me, Concha Buika, that she comes everyday to our frontpage because she loves our stories."

Back at Yahoo!, Noelia’s team spreads over the UK, Italy and Egypt, impacting our users every single day. Quoted as a leader who has “purple in her veins,” we’re proud to call Noelia a Yahoo!

Marissa Mayer

Yahoo! Appoints Marissa Mayer Chief Executive Officer

Posted: 16th of August, 2012

SUNNYVALE, Calif. -- Yahoo! (NASDAQ:YHOO) today announced that it has appointed Marissa Mayer as President and Chief Executive Officer and Member of the Board of Directors effective July 17, 2012. The appointment of Ms. Mayer, a leading consumer internet executive, signals a renewed focus on product innovation to drive user experience and advertising revenue for one of the world's largest consumer internet brands, whose leading properties include Yahoo Finance, Yahoo! Sports, Yahoo Mobile, Yahoo Mail, and Yahoo Search.

 

Mayer said, "I am honored and delighted to lead Yahoo!, one of the internet's premier destinations for more than 700 million users. I look forward to working with the Company's dedicated employees to bring innovative products, content, and personalized experiences to users and advertisers all around the world."

 

Most recently, Mayer was responsible for Local, Maps, and Location Services for Google, the company's suite of local and geographical products including Google Maps, Google Earth, Zagat, Street View, and local search, for desktop and mobile. Mayer joined Google in 1999 as its 20th employee and led efforts for many of Google's most recognizable products, including the development of its flagship search product and iconic homepage for over 10 years. Mayer managed some of Google's most successful innovations, launching more than 100 features and products including image, book and product search, toolbar, iGoogle, Google News, and Gmail — creating much of the "look and feel" of the Google user experience.

 

Yahoo! Co-Founder David Filo said, "Marissa is a well-known, visionary leader in user experience and product design and one of Silicon Valley's most exciting strategists in technology development. I look forward to working with her to enhance Yahoo's product offerings for our over 700 million unique monthly visitors."

 

"The Board of Directors unanimously agreed that Marissa's unparalleled track record in technology, design, and product execution makes her the right leader for Yahoo! at this time of enormous opportunity," said Fred Amoroso, Chairman of the Board of Directors.

 

Mayer received her B.S. in Symbolic Systems and her M.S. in Computer Science from Stanford University, specializing in artificial intelligence for both degrees. She is credited as an inventor on several patents in artificial intelligence and interface design.

 

"Yahoo!'s products will continue to enhance our partnerships with advertisers, technology and media companies, while inspiring and delighting our users. There is a lot to do and I can't wait to get started," Mayer said.

 

About Yahoo!

 

Yahoo! is a technology-powered media company, creating deeply personal digital experiences that keep more than half a billion people connected to what matters most to them, across devices and around the globe. Yahoo!'s unique combination of Science + Art + Scale connects advertisers to the consumers who build their businesses. Yahoo is headquartered in Sunnyvale, California. For more information, visit the pressroom (pressroom.yahoo.net) or the company's blog, Yodel Anecdotal (yodel.yahoo.com).

 

Marissa Mayer Biographical Information

 

Marissa Mayer was most recently Vice President of Local, Maps, and Location Services at Google where she oversaw product management, engineering, design and strategy for the company's suite of local and geographical products, including Google Maps, Google Earth, Zagat, Street View, and local search, for desktop and mobile. She also curated the Google Doodle program, celebrating special events on Google's homepage around the world.

 

During her 13 years at Google, Marissa held numerous positions, including engineer, designer, product manager, and executive, and launched more than 100 well-known features and products. She played an instrumental role in Google search, leading the product management effort for more than 10 years, a period during which Google Search grew from a few hundred thousand to well over a billion searches per day. Marissa led the development of some of Google's most successful services including image, book and product search, toolbar, and iGoogle, and defined such pivotal products as Google News and Gmail. She is listed as an inventor on several patents in artificial intelligence and interface design.

 

Joining as the company's first female engineer in 1999, Marissa played an important role in developing Google's culture. Her contributions included overseeing the look-and-feel of the company's iconic homepage and founding the Associate Product Manager program, which has hired over 300 of the company's future leaders and is considered the industry's ideal standard in transforming new computer science graduates into executive leaders.

 

Prior to joining Google, Marissa worked at the UBS research lab in Zurich, Switzerland and at SRI International in Menlo Park, California. She graduated with honors from Stanford University with a B.S. in Symbolic Systems and a M.S. in Computer Science. For both degrees, she specialized in artificial intelligence. While at Stanford, she taught computer programming to more than 3000 students and received the Centennial Teaching and Forsythe Awards for her contributions to undergraduate education. In 2008, the Illinois Institute of Technology awarded her an honorary doctorate of engineering.

 

She has been honored with the Matrix Award by the New York Women in Communications, as a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum, and as "Woman of the Year" by Glamour magazine. For four years running, Fortune has named her one of the 50 Most Powerful Women in Business, including when at age 33 she was the youngest woman ever included on the list.

 

Marissa serves on the board of directors of Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. She is also on the board of various non-profits, including the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the San Francisco Ballet, and the New York City Ballet.

 

Yahoo! is the trademark and/or registered trademark of Yahoo Inc. All other names are trademarks and/or registered trademarks of their respective owners.

 

 

 

 

Yahoo!

Dana Lengkeek, 415-994-4008

danal@yahoo-inc.com

 

 

 

Source: Yahoo!
http://pressroom.yahoo.net/pr/ycorp/236553.aspx

 

 

 


Southern California Hack Day 2011

Posted: 16th of September, 2011


Originally posted on the WIT blog.  By Karen Bruner.

Yahoo! has been hosting company-wide Hackdays two or three times a year now for several years, and while Yahoos in the Southern California offices were welcome to work on hacks, they didn't have the support of an organized local event. That changed for Summer Hackday 2011. The SoCal chapter of Yahoo!'s Women in Tech group, with funding from the Yahoo Developer Network, put together a great environment for local hackers to collaborate and concentrate on their hacks.

Prospective hackers listen to pitches over pizza

A week before Hackday, potential hackers came together to pitch ideas and find interested hackers. Hacking wasn't limited to engineers who fit the traditional definition of computer hacking. The Southern California offices have a large proportion of people in the advertising and business side, but they still have many of the necessary hacking skills: ideas, aesthetic input, and enthusiasm.

By the time Hackday rolled around, 19 hackers worked on several local projects that had come together. Hacks ran the gamut from ideas that could someday appear on the front pages of Yahoo!'s sites to internal tools that would make the behind-the-scenes run better. While most hackers were local to the Burbank office, Yahoos from the Santa Monica office also came to join the hacks. WIT volunteers kept them energized with drinks, munchies, and pizza.


SoCal Summer 2011 Hackers

For another first, the teams in Burbank got to present their hacks in the Friday afternoon demos via teleconferencing with Hackday HQ in Sunnyvale. Several dozen people, hackers and supporters alike, crowded in a boardroom over pizza and beer to watch the local demos. The enthusiasm and excitement from everybody was tremendous. Second-time Burbank hacker Srikanth Bangalore said this was a big improvement over his first Hackday, when he worked from his desk and had to record his demo so it could be replayed in the Sunnyvale demo session. Doing the demo live and having an energetic audience made for a very different experience.


A first: Burbank Hackday demos teleconfereced live with Sunnyvale 

Mariena Quintanilla's hack was related to her day-to-day work, a monitoring tool she had been needing for awhile but hadn't had time to work on. Hackday gave her the perfect chance. She found another would-be hacker to help out, and her tool will have an immediate impact.

With one successful Southern California Hackday under WIT's belt, the plan is to make this a regular event, allowing local Yahoos to tap their hacking talent more easily, which can only benefit Yahoo as a whole.

YMCA Women’s Career Day – Special Guest Writer Lexy Folkes

Posted: 14th of September, 2011
Originally posted on the WIT blog. By Kelli Lane.

An elite group of young ladies from the YMCA came to visit Y! WIT here in Burbank. Many of the girls were Seniors in High School who are working out their futures with careful planning. The Y! WIT team, led by Yolanda Person-Collins, spent time with the ladies in a true mentor fashion; conveying the reality of the hardships of life alongside the excitement for their future. Many women from Yahoo spoke, some with hard-knock lives and others successful with no degree to speak of, showing the girls that each person has their own path. The WIT team reinforced the unique path idea by assisting them with personality tests. The Meyer’s Briggs test showed them in which areas they may be best suited for a career. All in all, the girls responded well to the ideas. Three Seniors in High School cited Christine Del Muro as an inspiration to follow their dreams. Many girls that age admit to feeling lost. We hope the little time we had with them could promote confidence to reach out to older women and seek wisdom and advice.


The Girls

Rather than read from us how it went from our end, we asked Lexy Folkes, an aspiring writer from the program to tell us about her experience.

"It was the day after I graduated high school and my YMCA Adviser asked me to go to Yahoo Women’s Career Day. Get up at 7 and drive a car full of girls? No thanks. I was finally bribed and persuaded but it was well past worth it when I stepped through the doors of the Yahoo building and was dazzled by all the high tech lights. Five minutes later and I’m being greeted by a room full of inspirational women. I catch wind that there is free coffee and I almost cried. I return to the room, free latte in hand, and hear testimonials from women who play key roles in the functioning of the Yahoo business. The tour had a full showing of the Yahoo campus, which is surely modeled like a giant child’s playground. The entire show was met with another deliciously free meal and more words from the Yahoo representatives. Questions ensued with valuable pieces of advice dealt left and right. It wasn’t until the whole shebang was through that I came to fully appreciate the entire experience. I gravitated towards the woman who was the representative for the field I wish to pursue: writing, journalism and the arts. Her advice was invaluable and I took her challenges seriously. I’ve been presented with an opportunity to use my skills and exhibit my talents for Yahoo and it is through the willing, collaborative parts of the Yahoo women that presented this chance. The bribing and free coffee was a plus but the knowledge and guidance was far more appreciable."


Girls and WIT

Lexy, it was our pleasure. We look forward to updates about your life in the future. And to all the girls in the program who attended, WIT hopes to hear more about you in the future. We were the ones who were "dazzled" by your brilliant futures!

Let’s Do Lunch – Yahoo! Women Give Great Advice

Posted: 30th of November, 2011

Women In Tech had lunch with three extraordinary Yahoo leaders: Cheryl Ainoa, Fay Hellal and Yvette Martinez-Rea. Guests enjoyed Portos and some amazing insight.

The speakers answered audience questions such as:

    * “How do you deal with difficult people?”
    * “What are the benefits of having an MBA?”
    * “As a mother, how do you practice work-life balance?”
    * “How do we nurture a woman’s ambition?”

Here’s what our speakers recommended:

    * Know your manager’s, manager’s goals and help your boss to achieve those goal
    * Know your boundaries at home and at work
    * Know your priorities for excellence
    * Manage your guilt, set appropriate expectations
    * Set clear objectives when dealing with difficult people
    * And last, "Redefine difficult." Remember people process information differently

Key Insights on career development:

   1. Create a board of directors for your life compiled of the following types of board members from varied professions: a person two levels higher (mentor level), a peer, and a person two levels lower (mentee)
   2. Think about the expectations placed on your boss
   3. To better understand work politics read the book: It’s All Politics

Dealing with difficult people: There is a difference between a difficult superior and a difficult client or peer.

   1. Peers/clients: Find ways to influence peers towards a common goal-- do not dictate the path.
   2. Bosses: Take a step back and figure out the root issue, then apply that to your next encounter.
   3. Take the Meyers Briggs Test to find out more about personality types: here (the test costs money)

Nurturing Ambition/MBA FAQs

   1. MBA's can be helpful to show the mosaic picture, using other’s experiences in the business world, we can learn a lot.
   2. The more you see the “big picture” the more you will know how you can make an impact.
   3. Give yourself permission to learn.
   4. Learn how to “manage your guilt” as an ambitious person.
   5. Give yourself permission to get less than an “A” on the unimportant parts of life: (Make your time with your kids “A+” time, and time spent on after hour work calls "F")
noelia fernandez arroyo

Noelia, Head of Audience, EMEA

Posted: 31st of August, 2011

Career Profile: Noelia Fernandez Arroyo

Posted March 21, 2011
What’s the best way to build a terrific career? There isn’t a simple answer to this question, but a number of Yahoos have discovered their own keys to career success. Learn what advice they have to offer in our new Yahoo Career Profile series.  Noelia Fernandez Arroyo, head of editorial and content for Yahoo EMEA, was recruited nearly 13 years ago to set up the new Yahoo Spain property. Since then she’s had a variety of roles and currently works in the European HQ in Rolle, Switzerland.

Why do you stay at Yahoo!?
It’s a combination of various things. I strongly believe in entrepreneurship and one of the things I love doing –and that I think that I’m good at –is defining new opportunities and creating an atmosphere where people can flourish and make something happen. Yahoo! is the perfect place if you have the spirit of an entrepreneur because it gives you the room to explore and to bring things to reality. I also strongly believe that in Yahoo you can be a leader and also be yourself.  Because I started early in my country – early on the Internet and at a young age - I became a role model for female leadership. I have feminine values that I use a lot in my day to day – like empathy, building relationships and emotional connections and I think it’s great that women in the company feel they can grow as much as they want. The only limits are those we set for ourselves.

Can you talk about a specific scenario that created an extraordinary career experience for you?
I was recruited in Pamplona in September 1998 as a senior producer to launch the Yahoo Spain property. I moved to Madrid, and we launched the site on November 11. It was very much a Yahoo experience- lots of action, tight deadlines and a great team of people.  We had set up media interviews for the morning of November 11, so we had to be ready. We pushed the button at 3 a.m. that morning!
 What have been some of the key good fit opportunities for you over the last 12.5 years?
One great opportunity came a little over than 3 years ago. I suggested an idea about content and programming to the European leaders and that was the seed for the editorial and programming team in Europe. This business didn’t exist before. The tasks existed in separate departments but we needed a different way to look at it. I thought creating a single team was the most effective way of using the talent we have in the region and being more aligned with the Yahoo strategy So I started that by myself and found a group of people who could help me to make it a reality. Right now it’s a huge success, and now that the company is really focusing on content and editorial it has amplified the impact that my team has.

Why do you think our career development philosophy of finding the intersection between what you love and Yahoo!’s mission is such a good match for who Yahoo is –
Yahoo! is a place that allows you to become yourself in a very complete way – as a person and also as a professional.  Of course I’m not saying that it’s easy – it takes a lot of discipline and a lot of hard work but Yahoo  has a great atmosphere and it allows you to be who you want, and create the impact that you want to without putting barriers in your way. My progress has happened absolutely without following  a necessarily traditional career progression. The roles I’ve had have developed from my own ideas and passion for improving the business and managers who were there to listen and ensure we could develop both of those - Yahoo offers the opportunity to turn those ideas into reality.

What examples of the career development philosophy do you see in EMEA?
Whether I’ve been in Madrid, or Barcelona or London and now Switzerland, I’ve always had opportunities to go to training that helps you to become more aware of who you are, both as a person and as a professional.  I find the more I get to know about myself, the more I get to know about the impact that I make on the business, and the better I’m able to identify those opportunities. The training is available to everyone at Yahoo and we recently launched a program impacting most of Yahoo!’s managers. Everyone goes to the same program relating to goals, alignment, culture and accountability. That’s huge! When your colleagues all do that, you kind of take it for granted - but when I sit with my friends I find that other companies don’t always offer that kind of training.

What should others know about career development at Yahoo!?
Firstly, you have to be accountable for and deliver what you’re responsible for.   Then you have to be willing to progress and make and impact and, subject to what’s going on in your life, to give 150%.  But the big question is what you want to do.  I’ve found that in Yahoo it’s much more up to you to decide on your next career move than in other companies.  You have to start by trying to understand what you want to do, what you love doing that you’re really good at.  Then you’re in a position to have a great conversation with your manager around how your manager can help you to create more impact. If you have these conversations, then your manager also has the opportunity to tell you about roles they think would be a perfect fit for you. You have to listen, to pay attention to what you’re good at, and ask yourself what you want to do about it.

What’s the next step for you?
Between the world of content, the science and technology that Yahoo has, our becoming more and more of a global company, and figuring out great solutions for mobile and tablet users I could do so many things!  But, first, I really need to make sure my team is successful. We’ve have a great couple of years and  I want to make sure  we’re at place we need to be and then focus on how we can make this 10 times bigger or more successful. I sat down recently with my team leads and took a piece of paper to draw what the business should look like 3 or 4 years from now. Now I have to abstract myself a little from that and ask myself how we can make that happen.  So I don’t know exactly -- but I do know it will be fun. Fun is one of the core values of Yahoo - and you need to live it!